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Victorian DundeeImage and Realities$
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Christopher A. Whatley, Bob Harris, and Louise Miskell

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9781845860912

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781845860912.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 18 September 2021

‘An Insurrection of Maids’

‘An Insurrection of Maids’

Domestic Servants and the Agitation of 1872

Chapter:
(p.112) Chapter 6 ‘An Insurrection of Maids’
Source:
Victorian Dundee
Author(s):

Jan Merchant

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781845860912.003.0006

This chapter examines the events of Dundee's maidservants' agitation in 1872. On the evening of 19 April 1872, a meeting of local maidservants was held in Mathers' Hotel, Dundee, which concluded with the formation of the Dundee and District Domestic Servants' Association (DDDSA). The Dundee maids sought to improve the conditions of their employment and prevent the supercilious treatment meted out by many of their employers. Despite the aspects of service that sought to keep them humble and isolated, the maids felt they deserved the respect of their mistresses and of other groups of workers. The agitators were demanding to be treated like other employees, who benefited from various protective rights. The agitation also shows that the legendary brio of Dundee's women was not solely confined to the city's textile workers.

Keywords:   Dundee, workplace relations, domestic servants, maidservants, Dundee and District Domestic Servants' Association, textile workers

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