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DundeeRenaissance to Enlightenment$
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Charles McKean, Bob Harris, and Christopher A. Whatley

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9781845860165

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781845860165.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 03 June 2020

Dundee, London and the Empire in Asia

Dundee, London and the Empire in Asia

Chapter:
Chapter (p.160) 7 Dundee, London and the Empire in Asia
Source:
Dundee
Author(s):

Andrew Mackillop

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781845860165.003.0007

Dundee's eighteenth century has been portrayed as an ambiguous and ambivalent era, best characterised by slow if definite development. But the question of the burgh's interaction with the empire has generally been overlooked in that analysis. This chapter shows how the burgh's coasting trade to London provided a springboard into the East India Company's (EIC) merchant marine. Dundee's interaction with London offers an alternative model for understanding post-union Scotland's development within the empire. If Glasgow and Greenock thrived on a mercantile system of colonial imports and re-exports, Dundee reveals the way in which an ‘industrious’ regional metropolis could use a combination of political, social, and economic tactics to access the empire. Moreover, the links with London steered Dundonian and Angus networks into the Eastern rather than Western hemisphere of British imperialism.

Keywords:   Dundee, Scotland, burgh, Angus, British empire, East India Company, London, merchant marine, British imperialism

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