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Muslim Preaching in the Middle East and BeyondHistorical and Contemporary Case Studies$
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Simon Stjernholm and Elisabeth Özdalga

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781474467476

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474467476.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 17 September 2021

Discourses on Marriage, Religious Identity and Gender in Medieval and Contemporary Islamic Preaching: Continuities and Adaptations

Discourses on Marriage, Religious Identity and Gender in Medieval and Contemporary Islamic Preaching: Continuities and Adaptations

Chapter:
(p.173) 9 Discourses on Marriage, Religious Identity and Gender in Medieval and Contemporary Islamic Preaching: Continuities and Adaptations
Source:
Muslim Preaching in the Middle East and Beyond
Author(s):

Linda G. Jones

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474467476.003.0010

Because homiletics has been associated with marriage since the origins of Islam, analysing sermons on marriage from different historical periods allows us to identify continuities within the homiletic tradition and detect developments reflecting the preacher’s adaptation of his message to suit the needs, expectations and values of his audience. This chapter explores Islamic homiletic discourses about marriage, gender, and marital relations in an anonymous sixteenth-century Egyptian hortatory sermon (mawʿiẓa) on ‘the inalienable rights of the two spouses’ and a contemporary Friday khuṭba on ‘the path to a healthy marriage,’ preached by a Los Angeles-based American Muslim in 2016. This cross-cultural diachronic analysis seeks to explain how each preacher interprets the meaning of marriage, represents spousal relations and defines gender identities and roles for his audience. It then addresses the broader question of how to account for the continuities and adaptability of Islam as a religious tradition in light of changing circumstances.

Keywords:   gender in Islam, Islamic homiletics, Islamic marriage, Islamic sermons, marital relations in Islam, khuṭba

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