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Affect and Attention After Deleuze and WhiteheadEcological Attunement$
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Russell J. Duvernoy

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781474466912

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2021

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474466912.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 17 May 2022

Motivating Metaphysics: From Radical Empiricism to Process

Motivating Metaphysics: From Radical Empiricism to Process

Chapter:
(p.11) Chapter 1 Motivating Metaphysics: From Radical Empiricism to Process
Source:
Affect and Attention After Deleuze and Whitehead
Author(s):

Russell J. Duvernoy

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474466912.003.0002

This chapter explores motivations for speculative thinking in terms of the respective risks of certainty and creativity. Following their interests in thinking conditions of novelty and creativity, both Whitehead and Deleuze challenge Kantian meta-philosophical criteria that privilege apodictic certainty. The chapter then explores how such speculative thinking has historical roots in William James’ radical empiricism and especially the concept of pure experience. It shows how Whitehead’s diagnosis of the “bifurcation of nature” arising out of inconsistent commitments to metaphysical materialism and epistemic empiricism is refigured through radical empiricism. Finally, it raises the possibility of a realism that does not presume the necessary locus of a constituted metaphysical subject.

Keywords:   Deleuze, experience, William James, Radical empiricism, Jean Wahl, Whitehead

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