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Ageing in the Modern Arabic Novel$
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Samira Aghacy

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781474466752

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474466752.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 18 September 2021

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Ageing in the Modern Arabic Novel
Author(s):

Samira Aghacy

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474466752.003.0001

Through close readings of 16 novels by male and female Arab writers, the study traces the gradual move from an ahistorical homogeneous traditional ideology of ageing into an incongruous, diverse and fluid representation. It centres on ageing as a biological phenomenon viewed in essentialist terms. The cultural view perceives the ageing process as an unstable entity that intersects with sex, gender and changing political and social configurations. The novels range from tropes of elderly men and women within paternalistic structures to more open-ended models generated by social and demographic factors. The study concentrates on the inextricable link between the biological and constructionist models, creating an alternative configuration that fuses the biological with the discursive, making the ageing process multiple and plural.

Keywords:   gender, biological, ahistorical, political, social, constructionist, sex, cultural, paternalistic, discursive

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