Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Age of RoguesRebels, Revolutionaries and Racketeers at the Frontiers of Empires$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ramazan Öztan and Alp Yenen

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9781474462624

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2022

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474462624.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 02 July 2022

Between Ruler and Rogue: Sayyid Talib al-Naqib and the British in Early Twentieth-century Basra

Between Ruler and Rogue: Sayyid Talib al-Naqib and the British in Early Twentieth-century Basra

Chapter:
(p.235) 8 Between Ruler and Rogue: Sayyid Talib al-Naqib and the British in Early Twentieth-century Basra
Source:
Age of Rogues
Author(s):

Aline Schlaepfer

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474462624.003.0008

Sayyid Talib al-Naqib was born in Basra in the late 1860s to a family of nuqabāʾ, traditional leaders and marshals of the descendants of the Prophet Muhammad (ashrāf). After he was shortly considered a serious candidate for the crown of Iraq, his candidacy was eventually rejected in favor of Faysal, son of Husayn of Mekka. While Talib’s story has often been relegated to the margins of national and colonial histories, British sources give a stunning impression of the complexity of Talib’s strategies, and the challenges he presented for British administrations in Iraq, Egypt and India. By exploring British correspondence and reports on Talib – from Basra, Baghdad, Istanbul, Cairo, Damascus, Delhi and Bombay – as well as Iraqi historiography, press and memoirs, this chapter shows Talib’s deliberate use of his liminal position – between rogue and ruler – to maintain the balance of power in his favour. I use his story to show how the presumably clear-cut distinction between rogue and ruler, or the law and the outlaw characteristic of Hobsbawmian reading of social banditry, can prove to be problematic.

Keywords:   Basra, Iraq, British, Ottoman, Naqīb al-Ashrāf, India, Egypt

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.