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Age of RoguesRebels, Revolutionaries and Racketeers at the Frontiers of Empires$
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Ramazan Öztan and Alp Yenen

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9781474462624

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2022

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474462624.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 03 July 2022

Conspiracy, International Police Cooperation and the Fight against Anarchism in the Late Ottoman Empire, 1878–1908

Conspiracy, International Police Cooperation and the Fight against Anarchism in the Late Ottoman Empire, 1878–1908

Chapter:
(p.208) 7 Conspiracy, International Police Cooperation and the Fight against Anarchism in the Late Ottoman Empire, 1878–1908
Source:
Age of Rogues
Author(s):

lkay Yılmaz

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474462624.003.0007

This paper discusses the new legislative and administrative security reforms and practices in the Ottoman Empire, influenced by the anarchist fear in Europe and the anti-anarchist regulations against “propaganda by deed.” The Ottoman reform process was in line with the global synchronization of the modern states, but it cannot be seen only as a part of this global process. While the reform schemes regarding Macedonia and Eastern Anatolia became a battleground between the Great Powers and the Ottoman Empire after Berlin Treaty (1878), the Ottoman threat perceptions also created a new security discourse against revolutionaries, rebels and rogues. This paper examines how Hamidian state elites defined security concerns, the ways in which processes of securitization were operated and legitimised with discursive methods, and how these discursive strategies were produced globally and implemented in the Ottoman Empire. Particularly after 1878, the Ottoman government started to ground the threat perception based on the notion of a probable association between Armenians and revolutionary organisations. Besides the security discourse, this paper examines the concept of security as an embedded process in administrative regulations and their practices that open the discussion on routinized bureaucratic decisions and acts which created the normalization of internal security measures.

Keywords:   Anarchism, anti-anarchism, political violence, Ottoman Empire, security history

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