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The Modern Short Story and Magazine Culture, 1880-1950$
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Elke D'hoker and Chris Mourant

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781474461085

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2021

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474461085.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 05 December 2021

The Short Story in Wales (1937–1949): ‘Though we write in English, we are rooted in Wales’

The Short Story in Wales (1937–1949): ‘Though we write in English, we are rooted in Wales’

Chapter:
(p.293) Chapter 14 The Short Story in Wales (1937–1949): ‘Though we write in English, we are rooted in Wales’
Source:
The Modern Short Story and Magazine Culture, 1880-1950
Author(s):

Daniel Hughes

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474461085.003.0015

This chapter explores the ways in which Wales magazine (1937-49) sought to cultivate a distinctly Welsh modernist aesthetic, one best embodied in the work of contributors such as Dylan Thomas, Glyn Jones, and Lynette Roberts. Wales published English-language writing despite its sometimes Welsh-nationalist agenda, but it also demonstrates an awareness of and connections with the ‘intra-national’ dimensions of modernism across the United Kingdom. The magazine carried advertisements for Hugh MacDiarmid’s The Voice of Scotland, while also publishing fiction by writers such as Celia Buckmaster and Wyndham Lewis. While this modernist impulse is most obviously evident in the first run of the magazine (1937-40), the chapter argues that the short fiction published in its later incarnation as a cultural miscellany (1943-49) demonstrates continued engagement with both international and ‘intra-national’ modernist paradigms.

Keywords:   Wales, Dylan Thomas, Glyn Jones, Short story, Welsh writing in English, Welsh literature, Modernism

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