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The Modern Short Story and Magazine Culture, 1880-1950$
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Elke D'hoker and Chris Mourant

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781474461085

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2021

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474461085.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 06 July 2022

‘It is astonishing how little literature has to show of the life of the poor’: Ford Madox Ford’s The English Review and D. H. Lawrence’s Early Short Fiction

‘It is astonishing how little literature has to show of the life of the poor’: Ford Madox Ford’s The English Review and D. H. Lawrence’s Early Short Fiction

Chapter:
(p.86) Chapter 4 ‘It is astonishing how little literature has to show of the life of the poor’: Ford Madox Ford’s The English Review and D. H. Lawrence’s Early Short Fiction
Source:
The Modern Short Story and Magazine Culture, 1880-1950
Author(s):

Annalise Grice

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474461085.003.0005

Ford Madox Ford’s founding (but short lived) editorship of The English Review from 1908-1910 inspired and provided an early publication venue for the young D. H. Lawrence, who wrote several of his early stories and sketches to please his new literary mentor as he began to move in metropolitan literary circles. This chapter identifies a consistent focus on working-class themes across contributions to The English Review and outlines Ford’s interest in the conte, or what he termed ‘the real short story’, which was in Ford’s eyes best modelled by Henry James and the nineteenth-century European tradition of Maupassant and Balzac. These were writers Lawrence also admired and Ford deemed Lawrence’s earliest regional stories to be apposite for his cultural journal which called for more working class voices, an insight into the life of the poor and greater experimentation in the short form by English writers. The chapter also considers that Lawrence’s production of several (little-known) short sketches on his experiences as a schoolteacher in Croydon were intended for Ford’s journal.

Keywords:   D. H. Lawrence, Ford Madox Ford, The English Review, Working class writing, Regionalism, French literary influences, Formal aesthetics, short story

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