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BayanaThe Sources of Mughal Architecture$
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Mehrdad Shokoohy and Natalie H. Shokoohy

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781474460729

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2021

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474460729.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Chapter One Introduction
Source:
Bayana
Author(s):

Mehrdad Shokoohy

Natalie H. Shokoohy

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474460729.003.0001

Bayana, were it not for its shortage of water, might have been the capital of India. Strategically located in south-east Rajasthan on the route from Delhi to Gwalior and the Deccan, it attracted the attention of the Muslim conquerors, who made it their centre of power, with buildings praised by no less than Ibn Baṭṭūta. Until the founding of Agra it was the centre for control of the region, with the rulers, often autonomous, defying the Delhi sultans. Agriculture and the stone industry dominated, with sophisticated craftsmanship, but after a catastrophic earthquake in 1505 and the population’s migration to the newly founded capital, Agra, Bayana declined to the point that by the 19th century the Archaeological Survey of India reports show it as a forlorn remnant of past splendour. The previous archaeological studies along with the scope and field-work of the present study are outlined, as well as the present condition of the area and the regions’ influence and importance in the development of Mughal architecture.

Keywords:   Delhi, Gwalior, Deccan, Ibn Baṭṭūṭa, Agra, Archaeological Survey of India, Mughal architecture

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