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Home and Identity in Nineteenth-Century Literary London$
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Lisa C. Robertson

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781474457880

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474457880.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 03 July 2022

Fugitive Living: Social Mobility and Domestic Space in Julia Frankau’s The Heart of a Child

Fugitive Living: Social Mobility and Domestic Space in Julia Frankau’s The Heart of a Child

Chapter:
(p.111) Chapter 7 Fugitive Living: Social Mobility and Domestic Space in Julia Frankau’s The Heart of a Child
Source:
Home and Identity in Nineteenth-Century Literary London
Author(s):

Lisa C. Robertson

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474457880.003.0007

This chapter examines Julia Frankau’s The Heart of a Child (1908) a novel that documents a poor orphan’s social ascent. Despite the protagonist’s experience of a range of new models of domestic life – including model dwellings, a ‘home for working girls’, and an apartment (based on the Artillery Mansions in Victoria) – she remains circumscribed at each stage by her status as an unmarried woman. This novel’s satirical engagement with slum fiction reveals that all women’s lives are shaped by domestic insecurity – even if they are shaped differently.

Keywords:   Julia Frankau, The Heart of a Child, Slum Fiction, Home for Working Girls, Apartments, Artillery Mansions

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