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Home and Identity in Nineteenth-Century Literary London$
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Lisa C. Robertson

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781474457880

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474457880.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 28 September 2021

The Kailyard Comes to London: The Progressive Potential of Romantic Convention in Annie S. Swan’s A Victory Won

The Kailyard Comes to London: The Progressive Potential of Romantic Convention in Annie S. Swan’s A Victory Won

Chapter:
(p.95) Chapter 6 The Kailyard Comes to London: The Progressive Potential of Romantic Convention in Annie S. Swan’s A Victory Won
Source:
Home and Identity in Nineteenth-Century Literary London
Author(s):

Lisa C. Robertson

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474457880.003.0006

This chapter examines Annie S. Swan’s novel A Victory Won (1895) in the context of the generic conventions of the kailyard genre. Despite the novel’s romantic representation of the fictional ‘Barker Street Chambers’, which is based on the Chenies Street Chambers, it explores the value of the new social relationships that could emerge in such spaces. The novel focuses on a mutually supportive and egalitarian relationship between two women who share domestic space, and in so doing elaborates on the possibilities – rather than the drawbacks – of gender-segregated housing.

Keywords:   Annie Swan, A Victory Won, Kailyard, Chenies Street Chambers, Gender-Segregated Housing, Women’s Residences, Ladies’ Chambers, Romance

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