Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Gilles Deleuze's Luminous Philosophy$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Hanjo Berressem

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781474450713

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474450713.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 29 July 2021

Philosophical Times and Spaces

Philosophical Times and Spaces

Chapter:
(p.115) 3 Philosophical Times and Spaces
Source:
Gilles Deleuze's Luminous Philosophy
Author(s):

Hanjo Berressem

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474450713.003.0004

In luminist and cinematic registers, the chapter first explicates Deleuze’s complementary chronologics of Aion and Chronos. While durational Aion is the time of luminist glow, flickering Chronos is the time of strobe light: wave and particle. Shifting from time to space, the chapter then addresses Deleuze’s topologics. After introducing the notion of fractal space in terms of Deleuze’s notion of becoming-imperceptible, it delineates, via Leibniz’ images of the baroque house and the camera obscura, Deleuze’s transformation of the spatial dualism of light surface and dark depth into the luminous space of a fractal chiaroscuro, and it shows how Deleuze’s luminous philosophy resonates with Leibniz’ proposition that monads, as points or centres of light, have a luminous nature. After explicating the mathematical concept of the ‘real projective plane,’ the chapter argues that Deleuze’s shift from a Cartesian to a projective topology of thought is fundamental for an understanding of his philosophy.

Keywords:   Aion, Chronos, glow, strobe, fractal, camera obscura, chiaroscuro, monad, real projective plane, becoming-imperceptible

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.