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Turkey's Necropolitical LaboratoryDemocracy, Violence and Resistance$
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Banu Bargu

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781474450263

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474450263.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 02 August 2021

‘They wrote history with their bodies’: Necrogeopolitics, Necropolitical Spaces and the Everyday Spatial Politics of Death in Turkey

‘They wrote history with their bodies’: Necrogeopolitics, Necropolitical Spaces and the Everyday Spatial Politics of Death in Turkey

Chapter:
(p.46) Three ‘They wrote history with their bodies’: Necrogeopolitics, Necropolitical Spaces and the Everyday Spatial Politics of Death in Turkey
Source:
Turkey's Necropolitical Laboratory
Author(s):

Lerna K. Yanık

Fulya Hisarlıoğlu

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474450263.003.0003

In this piece, through an alternative reading of biopolitics and merging the literature on necropolitics with critical geography, we develop the concepts necrogepolitics and necropolitical spaces. We argue that the Turkish sovereign has very little difficulty in making death and self-sacrifice a desired behaviour by spatialising necropolitical power domestically and internationally. Necrogeopolitics emerges as a discursive practice that conditions the subject to die for the geopolitical and security interests of the sovereign, necropolitical spaces, on the other hand, are both material and discursive spaces that aim at the same goal at the domestic level. Both spaces condition the subjects for the idea that death is the appropriate behaviour if/when the state is under attack. This modification of social behaviour is engineered by the Turkish state in a very subtle, silent, and everyday manner. We discuss these instances of intervention through the necrogeopolitisation of Turkey’s territorial self, as well as the specific necrospatial changes that took place in the aftermath of the 15 July 2016 coup attempt.

Keywords:   necrogeopolitics, necropolitics, critical geopolitics, Turkey, monuments, martyrdom, spatial politics

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