Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Roman Law before the Twelve TablesAn Interdisciplinary Approach$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Sinclair W. Bell and Paul J. du Plessis

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781474443968

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474443968.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 17 September 2021

Central Italian Elite Groups as Aristocratic Houses in the Ninth to Sixth Centuries BCE

Central Italian Elite Groups as Aristocratic Houses in the Ninth to Sixth Centuries BCE

Chapter:
(p.25) Chapter 2 Central Italian Elite Groups as Aristocratic Houses in the Ninth to Sixth Centuries BCE
Source:
Roman Law before the Twelve Tables
Author(s):

Matthew C Naglak

Nicola Terrenato

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474443968.003.0003

This chapter demonstrates the applicability of C. Lévi-Strauss’s “House Society” model for considering the role of kinship in the early moments of state formation and urbanization in Iron Age Latium and Etruria. After a brief theoretical overview of the model, the discussion focuses on two main axioms which are often overlooked in the model’s application to the ancient world: (1) a physical house does not make a social House, and (2) a single House does not make a Society. This is followed by an overview of how material evidence from sites ranging from Vetulonia to Osteria dell’Osa and textual evidence from the Twelves Tables can be interpreted through the lens of a “House Society” to create new models for the development of complex social systems in central Italy.

Keywords:   House Society, Kinship, Roman Archaeology, Osteria dell’Osa, Iron Age Latium

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.