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Language Revitalisation in Gaelic ScotlandLinguistic Practice and Ideology$
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Stuart Dunmore

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781474443111

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474443111.001.0001

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Linguistic Practice, Gaelic Use and Language Socialisation: Findings from Qualitative and Quantitative Analyses

Linguistic Practice, Gaelic Use and Language Socialisation: Findings from Qualitative and Quantitative Analyses

Chapter:
(p.65) 4 Linguistic Practice, Gaelic Use and Language Socialisation: Findings from Qualitative and Quantitative Analyses
Source:
Language Revitalisation in Gaelic Scotland
Author(s):

Stuart Dunmore

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474443111.003.0004

Considering the overarching question of Gaelic language use, this chapter draws attention firstly to the varying degrees to which interview participants claim to use the Gaelic language in the present day. Three discernible categories or extents of use are apparent in interviewees’ accounts with respect to their present-day linguistic practices. The discussion subsequently considers two particular types of Gaelic use that are frequently reported within the interview corpus, relating to code-switching and use of Gaelic as a ‘secret’ language. As will be demonstrated, there exists a consistent relationship between higher levels of Gaelic ability and use in the present day, as there is between high levels of Gaelic use and past socialisation in the language at home and school. Triangulation of the qualitative and quantitative datasets thus produces a clear picture of limited ongoing Gaelic use among the majority of 130 Gaelic-medium educated adults who participated in the study, particularly in respect of the key domains of home and community.

Keywords:   Gaelic language use, Language socialisation, Code-switching, Ethnography of speaking, Correlational statistics

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