Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Distributed Cognition in Enlightenment and Romantic Culture$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Miranda Anderson, George Rousseau, and Michael Wheeler

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781474442282

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474442282.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 25 June 2021

Enacting the Absolute: Subject-Object Relations in Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s Theory of Knowledge

Enacting the Absolute: Subject-Object Relations in Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s Theory of Knowledge

Chapter:
(p.118) 7 Enacting the Absolute: Subject-Object Relations in Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s Theory of Knowledge
Source:
Distributed Cognition in Enlightenment and Romantic Culture
Author(s):

Lisa Ann Robertson

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474442282.003.0007

This chapter examines Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s ‘Theory of Life’ (1816/1848) and his theory of knowledge, discussed in Biographia Literaria (1817), through the lens of autopoietic enaction. It focuses on parallels between historical and contemporary theories, particularly their philosophical underpinnings, and argues that Coleridge’s theories are an important alternative to Cartesian accounts of the mind. Interrogating these theories in terms of enactive concepts, such as structural coupling, dynamic co-emergence, and mutual co-dependence, exposes the inherent embodied, embedded, and enacted premises on which Coleridge’s theory of cognition relies. The relationship between the subject and the object implicit in dualist and materialist theories reveals the effects assumptions about this relationship have on the way human beings understand themselves in relationship to nature and their own bodies – effects that are frequently inimical. The chapter concludes that Coleridge and the enactive approach offer valuable options for overcoming the schism between consciousness and nature, mind and world.

Keywords:   Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Biographia Literaria, ‘Theory of Life’, Autopoietic enaction, Embodied cognition, Embedded cognition, Enacted cognition, Cartesian account of mind, British Romanticism, Science of the mind

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.