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Modern Hadith StudiesContinuing Debates and New Approaches$
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Belal Abu-Alabbas, Christopher Melchert, and Michael Dann

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781474441797

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474441797.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 16 September 2021

Can Different Questions Yield the Same Answers? Islamic and Western Scholarship on Shiʿi Narrators in the Sunni Tradition

Can Different Questions Yield the Same Answers? Islamic and Western Scholarship on Shiʿi Narrators in the Sunni Tradition

Chapter:
(p.192) Chapter 9 Can Different Questions Yield the Same Answers? Islamic and Western Scholarship on Shiʿi Narrators in the Sunni Tradition
Source:
Modern Hadith Studies
Author(s):

Michael Dann

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474441797.003.0010

Michael Dann observes that Sunni traditionists paid some attention to transmission from Shiʿi traditionists. Sunni commentators identified different parties of the Shiʿah with the suggestion that adherents of some (especially mere tashayyuʿ) were more likely to be acceptable transmitters than adherents of others (especially rafḍ). Twelver Shiʿi scholars, notably Ibn ʿAqīl and Aḥmad al-Ghumārī, have collected biographical information on very many such Shiʿi traditionists, although often without much precision as to which variety of Shiʿism they adhered to. Sunni scholars, notably Ḥātim al-ʿAwnī and Muhammad Enes Topgül, have also studied the biographies of Shiʿi traditionists who appear in Sunni collections. Muslim scholars seem to be more or less affected by normative considerations, but likewise non-Muslim, inasmuch as they use the terms of competing traditions. Those who start on the Sunni side are more likely to define Shiʿism expansively, like medieval Sunni commentators, whereas those who start on the Shiʿi side are more likely to define Shiʿism narrowly, as implying clear sectarian affiliation.

Keywords:   Sunnism, Shiʿism, hadith, tashayyuʿ, rafḍ, Muḥammad ibn `Aqīl, Aḥmad al-Ghumārī, Ḥātim al-ʿAwnī, Muhammad Enes Topgül

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