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Byron and Marginality$
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Norbert Lennartz

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781474439411

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474439411.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 25 September 2021

Out of Romanticism: Byron and Romance

Out of Romanticism: Byron and Romance

Chapter:
(p.166) Chapter 9 Out of Romanticism: Byron and Romance
Source:
Byron and Marginality
Author(s):

Anna Camilleri

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474439411.003.0009

This essay considers Romance as a genre not only etymologically related to the literary epoch of Romanticism, but as forming a locus for Romantic interconnectedness. The central contention is that through his writing of and correspondence about the Romantic genre, Byron’s position as a writer central to the Romantic impulse can be ascertained. This essay seeks neither to fully equate Byron’s verse Romances with those of Coleridge, Scott or Moore, instead it tries to more fully articulate the centrality of Byron’s place as a writer of Romance within the Romantic canon than has been previously recognised. The essay is based on the premise that Byron’s poetry evidences the practice of genre hybridisation that was familiar to him through his readings of Goethe and A.W. Schlegel.

Keywords:   Romance, Hybridisation, Canon, Goethe, Medieval Revival, Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage, The Island

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