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Byron and Marginality$
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Norbert Lennartz

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781474439411

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474439411.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 25 September 2021

Reshaping the Romantic Canon from the Margins: The Medial Construction of ‘Byron’ in Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage

Reshaping the Romantic Canon from the Margins: The Medial Construction of ‘Byron’ in Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage

Chapter:
(p.40) Chapter 3 Reshaping the Romantic Canon from the Margins: The Medial Construction of ‘Byron’ in Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage
Source:
Byron and Marginality
Author(s):

Ralf Haekel

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474439411.003.0003

Byron has always been considered to belong to the canon of Romantic literature, but the place he occupies in the canon has been a special and recently a marginalised one. Byron’s phenomenal success and his special position within literary history is mainly the result of what is called the medial construction of “Byron”. The melancholic Byronic hero of the earlier works together with the narrative voice lead to rhetorical constructions of “Byron” that easily cross authorial and medial boundaries and turn into the Byronic vampire in Polidori’s novella, in the theatre and in the opera. In this reading of Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage, Byron is shown as the construct of medial and public perception.

Keywords:   Canon – canonicity, Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage, Byronic hero, Vampire, Polidori’s The Vampyre, Mediality, Self-construction

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