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Nordic Film Cultures and Cinemas of Elsewhere$
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Anna Westerstahl Stenport and Arne Lunde

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781474438056

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474438056.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

The Serpent’s Egg: Ingmar Bergman’s Exilic Elsewheres in 1970s New German and New Hollywood Cinema

The Serpent’s Egg: Ingmar Bergman’s Exilic Elsewheres in 1970s New German and New Hollywood Cinema

Chapter:
(p.341) 26. The Serpent’s Egg: Ingmar Bergman’s Exilic Elsewheres in 1970s New German and New Hollywood Cinema
Source:
Nordic Film Cultures and Cinemas of Elsewhere
Author(s):

Anna Westerstahl Stenport

Arne Lunde

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474438056.003.0026

This chapter focuses on Ingmar Bergman’s historical drama The Serpent’s Egg (1977), made in West Germany during the director’s 5-year self-imposed exile over a tax scandal in Sweden. Set during the hyper-inflationary Weimar Berlin of the early 1920s, the film retells in an expressionist mode the rise of German Nazism. Produced by Italian-born film mogul Dino DeLaurentiis and filmed on set in Munich with an international cast, The Serpent’s Egg was meant to provide an English-language European art film for American audiences, situating Bergman for Hollywood exposure. It simultaneously engaged with a silenced, repressed part of German history that New German Cinema directors had not yet begun to address by the mid-1970s. The massive exterior sets were re-used for Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Berlin Alexanderplatz (1980) and served a central role in that episodic TV-miniseries. Thus The Serpent’s Egg becomes not only an ‘elsewhere’ of Bergman’s production and New German Cinema, but also of New Hollywood.

Keywords:   Bergman, New German cinema, New Hollywood, Berlin, Munich, Exile, Fassbinder, DeLaurentiis

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