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Nordic Film Cultures and Cinemas of Elsewhere$
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Anna Westerstahl Stenport and Arne Lunde

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781474438056

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474438056.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

“There is no Elsewhere!”: Stories of Race, Decolonization, and Global Connectivity in Göran Hugo Olsson’s Documentaries

“There is no Elsewhere!”: Stories of Race, Decolonization, and Global Connectivity in Göran Hugo Olsson’s Documentaries

Chapter:
(p.169) 13. “There is no Elsewhere!”: Stories of Race, Decolonization, and Global Connectivity in Göran Hugo Olsson’s Documentaries
Source:
Nordic Film Cultures and Cinemas of Elsewhere
Author(s):

Lill-Ann Körber

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474438056.003.0013

This chapter focuses on interviews with Swedish film maker Göran Hugo Olsson, about his films The Black Power Mixtapes 1967-1975 (2011) and Concerning Violence (2014), framed with an introduction and contextualization. Both films are based on found footage and archival material. The chapter deals with “elsewheres” of Nordic film in a geographical and in a temporal sense: What has today’s Sweden got to do with the histories of the Black Power Movement in the United States, addressed in The Black Power Mixtapes 1967-1975, and with decolonization wars and liberation movements in West, southern and East Africa thematized in Concerning Violence? This interconnectedness in time and space is characteristic for Olsson’s films. The chapter asks in which sense does the re-actualization of archival material contribute to a historicization of contemporary issues of (post-) colonialism and racism? In which sense do the films contribute to, or challenge, narratives of Sweden’s exceptional position in an asymmetrical world order?

Keywords:   Documentary, Race, Decolonization, Global, connectivity

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