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Challenging CosmopolitanismCoercion, Mobility and Displacement in Islamic Asia$
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Joshua Gedacht and R. Michael Feener

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781474435093

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474435093.001.0001

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Variations of ‘Islamic Military Cosmopolitanism’: The Survival Strategies of Hui Muslims during the Modern Period

Variations of ‘Islamic Military Cosmopolitanism’: The Survival Strategies of Hui Muslims during the Modern Period

Chapter:
(p.121) 5 Variations of ‘Islamic Military Cosmopolitanism’: The Survival Strategies of Hui Muslims during the Modern Period
Source:
Challenging Cosmopolitanism
Author(s):

Tatsuya Nakanishi

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474435093.003.0005

Hui Muslims have devised various forms of ‘Islamic cosmopolitanism’ through Islamic legal responses to external domination. This chapter provides three case studies to examine how Hui Muslims have both survived as religiously observant and ethnically distinct Muslims among non-Muslim Chinese, while simultaneously remaining loyal citizens to a non-Islamic state. First, Ma Anyi in his 1905 work, Taḥqīq al-īmān, situated Chinese Muslims outside the territory that the global umma had to defend as a means to protect the personal security of Muslims under non-Islamic Qing rule. Wang Jingzhai (d. 1949) directed attention away from global umma discourses to argue for China to be considered as an Islamic country. Lastly, Hui writers in the journal Yuehua invoked the Muslim unity for a defensive jihād against the Japanese. Through these cases, this chapter shows how Islamic cosmopolitanism reflected majority pressures on minority communities and the friction between different religious values and legal orders.

Keywords:   China, Han Kitab, Hui Muslims, Ma Anyi, Wang Jingzhai

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