Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Women, Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1830s-1900sThe Victorian Period$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Alexis Easley, Clare Gill, and Beth Rodgers

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781474433907

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2020

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474433907.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 09 April 2020

Wings and the Woman’s Signal: Reputation and Respectability in Women’s Temperance Periodicals, 1892–1899

Wings and the Woman’s Signal: Reputation and Respectability in Women’s Temperance Periodicals, 1892–1899

Chapter:
(p.555) 35 Wings and the Woman’s Signal: Reputation and Respectability in Women’s Temperance Periodicals, 1892–1899
Source:
Women, Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1830s-1900s
Author(s):

Gemma Outen

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474433907.003.0036

Gemma Outen’s essay revisits a familiar genre of pressure-group periodical, the women’s temperance magazine, in order to complicate what we think we know about its political aims and effects. As Annemarie McAllister has pointed out, temperance periodicals were not just one-dimensional pressure-group publications run by ‘pious, life-denying hypocrites’ who aimed to ‘control a passive working class.’ Outen builds upon this idea by exploring how temperance periodicals reveal the ‘complexities within women’s temperance work and its relation to prevailing gender ideologies’ (p. 557). Taking Wings (1892–1925) and the Woman’s Signal (1894–9) as her case studies, she argues that women’s temperance periodicals functioned as ‘spaces in which debates about the private and public collided, where women were shaped both as reforming creatures, of both political and moral means, but also as gendered domestic beings, wives, and mothers’ (p. 566). While the Woman’s Signal was more overtly political, Wings ‘[equipped] its women readers with the tools to engage subtly in less transgressive forms of political activism’ (p. 566). Both periodicals included political columns but also implicitly addressed women’s issues in more surprising locations, such as advertising pages.

Keywords:   Pressure-group periodical, women’s temperance magazine, Wings, Woman’s Signal, political columns, advertising

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.