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Women, Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1830s-1900sThe Victorian Period$
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Alexis Easley, Clare Gill, and Beth Rodgers

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781474433907

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2020

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474433907.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 01 April 2020

Brewing Storms of War, Slavery, and Imperialism: Harriet Martineau’s Engagement with the Periodical Press

Brewing Storms of War, Slavery, and Imperialism: Harriet Martineau’s Engagement with the Periodical Press

Chapter:
(p.489) 30 Brewing Storms of War, Slavery, and Imperialism: Harriet Martineau’s Engagement with the Periodical Press
Source:
Women, Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1830s-1900s
Author(s):

Lesa Scholl

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474433907.003.0031

Harriet Martineau’s important writings on the American Civil War and the Crimean War (1854–62) are the focus of Lesa Scholl’s essay. Scholl argues that Martineau used these conflicts to reflect on issues of ‘human freedom and economic imperial endeavour’ (p. 490). These conflicts had implications not only for Americans and Russians but also for British readers as well–connections that she carefully highlighted in essays published in the prestigious Westminster Review (1824–1914) and Edinburgh Review (1802–1929). The long-essay format provided the space she needed to contextualise contemporary conflicts within a broader historical narrative, ‘[educating] her fellow citizens regarding their own behavior on the international stage’ (p. 490). In this way, she ‘maximised the impact of periodicals as democratic media that incorporated multitudinous voices, reached international audiences, and could be used to promote broad economic and political reform’ (p. 500).

Keywords:   Harriet Martineau, American Civil War, Crimean War, Westminster Review, Edinburgh Review, long essay, political reform, economic reform

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