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Women, Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1830s-1900sThe Victorian Period$
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Alexis Easley, Clare Gill, and Beth Rodgers

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781474433907

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2020

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474433907.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 01 December 2020

Encouraging Charitable Work and Membership in the Girls’ Friendly Society through British Girls’ Periodicals

Encouraging Charitable Work and Membership in the Girls’ Friendly Society through British Girls’ Periodicals

Chapter:
(p.140) 9 Encouraging Charitable Work and Membership in the Girls’ Friendly Society through British Girls’ Periodicals
Source:
Women, Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1830s-1900s
Author(s):

Kristine Moruzi

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474433907.003.0010

This chapter ecplores models of femininity with practical applications for girls outside the home. Moruzi uses the Girls’ Friendly Society as a case study to demonstrate how religious magazines aimed at girls in the 1860s and 1870s supported the work of the charity through the promotion of an idealised form of philanthropic girlhood (dutiful, moral, and virtuous) that readers were encouraged to emulate, irrespective of their class positions. Yet by tracing the promotion of the charity through magazines aimed at girls of different classes, including the Monthly Packet (1851–99), which targeted middle-class girls, and the Girls’ Own Paper (1880–1956), which largely addressed working-class and lower-middle-class girls, Moruzi shows that the specific roles and behavioural expectations assigned to girls were very much aligned with their class. In spite of these tensions, these magazines helped to foster communities of girls bound by common reading materials and active engagement with charitable pursuits.

Keywords:   Girls’ Friendly Society, girls’ periodicals, religious magazines, Monthly Packet, Girls’ Own Paper, social class, philanthropy

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