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Postfeminist WhitenessProblematising Melancholic Burden in Contemporary Hollywood$
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Kendra Marston

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781474430296

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474430296.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 27 September 2021

Sofia Coppola’s Melancholic Aesthetic: Vanishing Femininity in an Object-oriented World

Sofia Coppola’s Melancholic Aesthetic: Vanishing Femininity in an Object-oriented World

Chapter:
(p.162) Chapter 6 Sofia Coppola’s Melancholic Aesthetic: Vanishing Femininity in an Object-oriented World
Source:
Postfeminist Whiteness
Author(s):

Kendra Marston

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474430296.003.0007

Chapter Six offers a close reading of Sofia Coppola’s first three feature films, arguing that these texts provide critiques of neoliberal postfeminist culture through the heroines’ experience of a melancholic existential inertia. It is an integral feature of these films, however, that protagonists racialised as white and socio-economically empowered are incapable of decentring their experience to see, hear or otherwise relate to subjects racialised as non-white—especially in so far as these subjects are positioned below them in status and class hierarchies. Coppola has managed to capitalise on a cultural mood of postfeminist melancholia in order to sell stories of white female burden not only through her cinematic endeavours but her fashionable collaborations also. Yet, her cinema also capitalises on the association of melancholia with specialness in offering romanticised portraits of protagonists confined not only by their society, but by their own propensity for introspective processes which prove both pleasurable and pointlessly apathetic.

Keywords:   Smart cinema, Female auteurs, Cinematic mood, Postfeminist adolescence, Death on film

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