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Resistance and PsychoanalysisImpossible Divisions$
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Simon Morgan Wortham

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781474429603

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474429603.001.0001

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Something (or Nothing) to be Scared of: Meillassoux, Klein, Kristeva

Something (or Nothing) to be Scared of: Meillassoux, Klein, Kristeva

Chapter:
(p.185) 7 Something (or Nothing) to be Scared of: Meillassoux, Klein, Kristeva
Source:
Resistance and Psychoanalysis
Author(s):

Simon Morgan Wortham

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474429603.003.0008

This chapter explores the work of Quentin Meillassoux, the thinker perhaps most associated with the recent speculative-materialist turn in continental thought. Meillassoux argues that post-Kantian philosophy succumbs to a principle of correlation between thinking and being, wherein the one cannot be contemplated outside of the other. This chapter focuses on Meillassoux’s argument about the necessity of contingency as something not to be confused with a probabilistic idea of chance, one that might condemn us to perpetual fearfulness. While the possibility of such trepidation is supposedly overcome by Meillassouxian thought, the fact that it is far from prevalent among or endorsed by even the strongest correlationists invites us to reconsider its perhaps ambivalent and divided resources, prompting us to ask whether they may indeed be reduced to an image of oppositional difference. This suggestion is developed through the work of Melanie Klein. Moreover, the chapter observes that the ‘unreason’ (that which cannot be correlated as such) which accompanies the flight from so-called correlationism may not simply lead in the direction of science, as Meillassoux suggests. For with the demise of correlation, as Julie Kristeva pointed out long ago, we also risk a descent into psychosis.

Keywords:   Meillassoux, Kant, Klein, Kristeva, correlation, psychosis

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