Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Commemorating PeterlooViolence, Resilience, and Claim-making during the Romantic Era$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Michael Demson and Regina Hewitt

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781474428569

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2020

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474428569.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 02 July 2022

Wordsworth after Peterloo: The Persistence of War in The River Duddon … and other Poems

Wordsworth after Peterloo: The Persistence of War in The River Duddon … and other Poems

Chapter:
(p.250) Chapter 11 Wordsworth after Peterloo: The Persistence of War in The River Duddon … and other Poems
Source:
Commemorating Peterloo
Author(s):

Philip Shaw

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474428569.003.0012

This chapter discusses William Wordsworth's The River Duddon, A Series of Sonnets, published in April 1820, just prior to the poet's visit to the site of the Peterloo Massacre. As the Duddon sonnets and their accompanying poems reveal, aspects of civil discord are manifest throughout the volume, consuming not merely the city but also nature. Drawing on Giorgio Agamben's Stasis: Civil War as a Political Paradigm (2015), the chapter argues that Wordsworth's engagement with Horace and Virgil evokes classical anxieties about the politicization of nature and the impossibility of establishing a society that is not always already at war with itself.

Keywords:   Wordsworth, William, Peterloo, violence, River Duddon, Agamben, Giorgio, Horace, Virgil

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.