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Multicultural Governance in a Mobile World$
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Anna Triandafyllidou

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781474428231

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474428231.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 03 April 2020

Settlers or Movers? The Temporality of Past Migrations, Political Inaction and its Consequences, 1945–1985

Settlers or Movers? The Temporality of Past Migrations, Political Inaction and its Consequences, 1945–1985

Chapter:
(p.63) 3 Settlers or Movers? The Temporality of Past Migrations, Political Inaction and its Consequences, 1945–1985
Source:
Multicultural Governance in a Mobile World
Author(s):

Jozefien De Bock

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474428231.003.0004

Historically, those societies that have the longest tradition in multicultural policies are settler societies. The question of how to deal with temporary migrants has only recently aroused their interest. In Europe, temporary migration programmes have a much longer history. In the period after WWII, a wide range of legal frameworks were set up to import temporary workers, who came to be known as guest workers. In the end, many of these ‘guests’ settled in Europe permanently. Their presence lay at the basis of European multicultural policies. However, when these policies were drafted, the former mobility of guest workers had been forgotten. This chapter will focus on this mobility of initially temporary workers, comparing the period of economic growth 1945-1974 with the years after the 1974 economic crisis. Further, it will look at the kind of policies that were developed towards guest workers in the era before multiculturalism. This way, it shows how their consideration as temporary residents had far-reaching consequences for the immigrants, their descendants and the receiving societies involved. The chapter will finish by suggesting a number of lessons from the past. If the mobility-gap between guest workers and present-day migrants is not as big as generally assumed, then the consequences of previous neglect should serve as a warning for future policy making.

Keywords:   guest workers, temporary migration, mobility, labour migration, settlement, integration, migration policy, multiculturalism, historical perspective, 1974

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