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Space in Modern Egyptian Fiction$
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Yasmine Ramadan

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781474427647

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474427647.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 28 July 2021

The Politics and Economics of Exile

The Politics and Economics of Exile

Chapter:
(p.154) 4 The Politics and Economics of Exile
Source:
Space in Modern Egyptian Fiction
Author(s):

Yasmine Ramadan

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474427647.003.0005

The fourth chapter takes the reader beyond the boundaries of the Egyptian nation, to Europe and the Gulf, to explore the space of political and economic dislocation, and brings together the work of Bahaa Taher and Muhammad al-Bisati. It traces the transformation of the exilic novel from the early decades of the twentieth century: while early Arabic narratives showed a movement beyond the borders of Egypt largely for the purposes of education, Taher’s Al-Hubb fi al-manfa (Love in Exile, 1995) and al-Bisati’s Daqq al-tubul (Drumbeat, 2006) depict Europe as the space of political exile, and the Arab Gulf as the site of economic exploitation. In both cases the novels under examination raise questions about the unity of the Egyptian nation-state in an age where political, social, and economic flows extend beyond the boundaries of the nation. The two works engage not only with issues of national identity and belonging, but also with that of regional affiliation. highlighting how the experience of economic and political dislocation serves to illuminate the failure Abdel Nasser’s Arab nationalist dream, and its dissolution under the regimes of Sadat and Mubarak in the following decades.

Keywords:   Exile, Bahaa Taher, Muhammad al-Bisati, Arab Gulf, Dislocation

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