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Katherine Mansfield and Russia$
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Galya Diment, Gerri Kimber, and W. Todd Martin

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781474426138

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474426138.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 25 September 2021

At Home Among the Russians: The Short Stories of Olive Garnett and Katherine Mansfield

At Home Among the Russians: The Short Stories of Olive Garnett and Katherine Mansfield

Chapter:
(p.107) At Home Among the Russians: The Short Stories of Olive Garnett and Katherine Mansfield
Source:
Katherine Mansfield and Russia
Author(s):

Frances Reading

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474426138.003.0007

The purpose of this article is to incorporate the little-studied writer, Olive Garnett, into the discussion surrounding Katherine Mansfield in relation to Russian themes. Both Mansfield and Garnett had a common interest in Russia and, writing in the same literary milieu, both wrote short stories about Russia and Russians. Where the interest in Russia comes from for Garnett and Mansfield forms a substantial part of this article. Both were influenced by various Russian radicals and philosophers, such as Nikolai Chernyshevsky who conceivably served to inspire the writing of both women. The context will stem from the ‘Russomania’ that took hold from the 1880s onwards, culminating in the subsequent fin-de-siècle and post-Great War paranoias within the British national consciousness which expressed itself in the form of prejudice towards the foreign Other. It will consider the influence Russia, and Russian people, had on the style and work of Mansfield and Garnett, and in turn reveal how both writers present Russia.

Keywords:   Katherine Mansfield, Olive Garnett, Nikolai Chernyshevsky, Russomania, Russophobia, Wars and Revolutions, Émigrés

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