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Rethinking Humanitarian Intervention in the 21st Century$
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Aiden Warren and Damian Grenfell

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781474423816

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474423816.001.0001

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Regulating the Abstraction of Violence: Interventions and the Deployment of New Technologies Globally

Regulating the Abstraction of Violence: Interventions and the Deployment of New Technologies Globally

Chapter:
(p.216) 9 Regulating the Abstraction of Violence: Interventions and the Deployment of New Technologies Globally
Source:
Rethinking Humanitarian Intervention in the 21st Century
Author(s):

Aiden Warren

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474423816.003.0010

Aiden Warren argues in Chapter Nine:The Changing Face of Interventions and the Deployment of New Technologies that the continual advancement of new technologies in theaters of conflict, and more specifically in the context of interventions, pose some very distinct challenges. These challenges are examined in relation to notions of regulation, associated moral, ethical and legal debates, as well as logistical dimensions. As the most topical form of new technology, the chapter looks at the increase in the use of drones as well as debates regarding their viability as an option in humanitarian contexts. Warren also considers the implications surrounding their utility and the ‘dehumanization of death,’ including those actors who are complicit in their science and construction. In the context of humanitarian interventions, the chapter interrogates the varying debates pertaining to the potential of drone usage and the security dilemmas that could arise should they continue to become a significant option in a states’ repertoire of intervention. Lastly, he argues, as technology rapidly advances and drones become wholly “off the loop” in the form of “killer robots,” additional complexities may arise in future security scenarios and the need for new regulations.

Keywords:   Interventions, State Violence, International Security, New Technology, Drones, Laws

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