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Adam Smith and RousseauEthics, Politics, Economics$
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Maria Pia Paganelli, Dennis C. Rasmussen, and Craig Smith

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781474422857

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474422857.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 02 April 2020

Citizens, Markets and Social Order: An Aristotelian Reading of Smith and Rousseau on Justice

Citizens, Markets and Social Order: An Aristotelian Reading of Smith and Rousseau on Justice

Chapter:
(p.214) 11 Citizens, Markets and Social Order: An Aristotelian Reading of Smith and Rousseau on Justice
Source:
Adam Smith and Rousseau
Author(s):

Jimena Hurtado

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474422857.003.0011

Justice is the corner stone of society; but not any justice. Adam Smith and Jean-Jacques Rousseau differ on the type of justice needed to guarantee a well-ordered and prosperous society. There are different types of justice that regulate different kinds and levels of social interactions. Some involve our direct relationships with our fellow-beings others our relationship with the law as the expression of our will as citizens. This chapter uses Aristotle’s understanding of justice in the city to assess the differences in the types of justice Smith and Rousseau consider fundamental for society. Through this lens it is possible to understand the difference between commutative justice, which Smith rendered the building block of society, and universal justice, which Rousseau considered the backbone of the society of the general will. This difference furthers our understanding of the coincidences and differences in their appraisal of commercial society.

Keywords:   commutative justice, universal justice, social interactions, fellow-beings, citizens

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