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Journeys on ScreenTheory, Ethics, Aesthetics$
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Louis Bayman and Natália Pinazza

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781474421836

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474421836.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 18 November 2019

Transnational Productions and Regional Funding: Border-crossing, European Locations and the Case of Contemporary Horror

Transnational Productions and Regional Funding: Border-crossing, European Locations and the Case of Contemporary Horror

Chapter:
(p.215) Chapter 13 Transnational Productions and Regional Funding: Border-crossing, European Locations and the Case of Contemporary Horror
Source:
Journeys on Screen
Author(s):

Stefano Baschiera

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474421836.003.0014

This chapter investigates transnational co-productions, regional funding, film commissions and European locations in the new wave of European horror cinema of the new millennium. Since the international success of Hostel (2005) European locations have once again become appealing settings for Horror films, contributing to a new flourishing of the genre in Europe. In particular, we have witnessed a new development of the so-called 'road horror movie', a sub-genre traditionally characterized by border crossing, touristic activities and exotic locations. Film such as Frontier(s)(2006), Calvaire (The Ordeal, 2004), Manhunt (Rovdyr 2008), Ils (Them 2006) and The Pack (Le Meute, 2007) show traveling as a crucial theme. This chapter will engage, first of all, with the production features of these films, focusing on the involvement of regional film commissions and European co-production agreements, in order to investigate the local/global dimension of these productions, generally aimed at an international audience. Secondly, it will analyse the use of locations and how it mirrors European film policies as well as the idea of "Europe" and a “post-industrial” identity.

Keywords:   European co-production, European locations, road horror, regional film commissions, The Pack/Le Meute

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