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Journeys on ScreenTheory, Ethics, Aesthetics$
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Louis Bayman and Natália Pinazza

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781474421836

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474421836.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 18 November 2019

Shadows of Unforgotten Ancestors: Representations of Estonian Mass Deportations of the 1940s in In the Crosswind and Body Memory

Shadows of Unforgotten Ancestors: Representations of Estonian Mass Deportations of the 1940s in In the Crosswind and Body Memory

Chapter:
(p.103) Chapter 6 Shadows of Unforgotten Ancestors: Representations of Estonian Mass Deportations of the 1940s in In the Crosswind and Body Memory
Source:
Journeys on Screen
Author(s):

Eva Näripea

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474421836.003.0007

The chapter focuses on recent cinematic representations of one of the most dramatic collective journeys of Estonian history – the massive Soviet deportations of Estonians in June 1941 and in March 1949. In mid-June 1941, about 9,000 Estonians, mostly women and children from urban areas, were crammed into cattle cars and exiled to Siberia; in late March 1949, over 20,000 people (more than 2.5% of the Estonian population, two thirds of them women), condemned as ‘the people’s enemies’ by the Soviet authorities, met the same destiny. Portraying these involuntary journeys, both Ülo Pikkov’s stop motion short Body Memory (Keha mälu, 2011) and Martti Helde’s feature-length (live-action) debut In the Crosswind (Risttuules, 2014) take up the complex questions of collective (national) memory and identity by means of experimental narrative and audiovisual form. This chapter investigates how these films engage with the particular historical events, and (collective) memories of them, utilising a study of national narratives on screen by David Martin-Jones (2006), which considers the concepts of national history and identity in the light of Gilles Deleuze’s (1989) and Homi K. Bhabha’s (1990) writings.

Keywords:   collective memory on screen, deportations, Estonian cinema, Martti Helde, Ülo Pikkov

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