Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Women's Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1690-1820sThe Long Eighteenth Century$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jennie Batchelor and Manushag N. Powell

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781474419659

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474419659.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 18 September 2021

Advertising Women: Gender and the Vendor in the Print Culture of the Medical Marketplace, 1660–1830

Advertising Women: Gender and the Vendor in the Print Culture of the Medical Marketplace, 1660–1830

Chapter:
(p.411) 26 Advertising Women: Gender and the Vendor in the Print Culture of the Medical Marketplace, 1660–1830
Source:
Women's Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1690-1820s
Author(s):

Barbara M. Benedict

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474419659.003.0027

This essay asks when and how did early periodical advertisements identify or solicit consumers by gender? In response to this question, Barbara Benedict analyses the representations and self-representation of women medical practitioners (physicians and apothecaries) and the female body in handbills and newspaper advertisements from 1650 to 1751. It argues that the rough-and-tumble world of advertisement provided women with opportunities to capitalise on their gendered physicality, despite the social and gender prejudices this move entailed. Benedict illuminates how medical ads by women physicians occupy an ambiguous position as simultaneously participants in the public world, the printed marketplace, and as privileged or limited by their special connection to domesticity, and particularly to the body. Print, the essay concludes, enabled early female medical practitioners to compete in the medical marketplace.

Keywords:   advertisements, women in medicine, physicians, apothecaries, newspapers, handbills, body, domesticity

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.