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Women's Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1690-1820sThe Long Eighteenth Century$
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Jennie Batchelor and Manushag N. Powell

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781474419659

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474419659.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

Reviewing Women: Women Reviewers on Women Novelists

Reviewing Women: Women Reviewers on Women Novelists

Chapter:
(p.236) 15 Reviewing Women: Women Reviewers on Women Novelists
Source:
Women's Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1690-1820s
Author(s):

Megan Peiser

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474419659.003.0016

What is the place of women writers in literary history, and the history of women’s print media? Megan Peiser’s chapter answers these questions through the specific lens of Romantic women reviewers’ assessments of work by Romantic women novelists. The chapter begins by accounting for the difficulties of its approach. Since periodical voices are often collaborative, anonymous/pseudonymous and published serially they require readers to chase their commitment to these publications through multiple issues rather than declaring completeness and authority through a single accessible printing. The chapter proceeds with detailed accounts of the reviewing careers of Elizabeth Moody and Anna Barbauld and how they used their contingent presence as writers for the Monthly Review (1749–1844) to bolster the works of women writers of the period in a medium that has traditionally been perceived to be hostile to women’s writing.

Keywords:   Reviews, anonymous publication, Monthly Review, Anna Barbauld, Elizabeth Moody, women novelists, print media, literary history, women’s writing

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