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Women's Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1690-1820sThe Long Eighteenth Century$
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Jennie Batchelor and Manushag N. Powell

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781474419659

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474419659.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

Vindications and Reflections: The Lady’s Magazine during the Revolution Controversy (1789–1795)

Vindications and Reflections: The Lady’s Magazine during the Revolution Controversy (1789–1795)

Chapter:
(p.67) 4 Vindications and Reflections: The Lady’s Magazine during the Revolution Controversy (1789–1795)
Source:
Women's Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1690-1820s
Author(s):

Koenraad Claes

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474419659.003.0005

This essay examines how the French Revolution and the controversy it spawned figure in one of the most important British women’s magazines of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century: George Robinson’s Lady’s Magazine (1770–1832). Even though most scholars who have written on the magazine have dismissed it as an organ of female domestication, Koenraad Claes demonstrates that this pioneering publication is uniquely qualified as a document on this politically turbulent period. While the Lady’s Magazine, like most magazines, cannot be said to be a straightforward organ of any ideological position, it consistently made room for radical reformist views of the likes of Catharine Macaulay, Thomas Paine, Helen Maria Williams and Mary Wollstonecraft. Through a detailed analysis of how the successive phases of the Revolution Controversy, Claes reveals how readers of this period’s British women’s periodicals were better informed about ongoing political debates than we have long presumed.

Keywords:   Lady’s Magazine, French Revolution, Revolution Controversy, George Robinson, Thomas Paine, Mary Wollstonecraft, Catharine Macaulay, Helen Maria Williams, politics, radicalism

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