Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Jane Austen, Virginia Woolf and Worldly Realism$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Pam Morris

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781474419130

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474419130.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 18 September 2021

The Years: Moment of Transition

The Years: Moment of Transition

Chapter:
(p.167) Chapter 6 The Years: Moment of Transition
Source:
Jane Austen, Virginia Woolf and Worldly Realism
Author(s):

Pam Morris

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474419130.003.0007

In The Years, Woolf foregrounds the private house as materialised geography of multiple force fields of change and conservatism. The house constitutes the interface between the biological necessities of embodied creatures and the regulatory, reiterative codes of gender and class that produce identity. Woolf attends to a moment in the 1930s when large scale public provision of housing and the necessary infrastructure of utilities extended the public terrain into what had previously been the private domain. The potential convergence of class values and life style, brought about by extension of plumbing and wiring, however, came into conflict with demand for home-owning consumerism and privacy. Woolf brings into visibility and audibility the common life of London streets and the shared realm of the physical world in opposition to the regulated individualism sheltered in the family house.

Keywords:   house, home, plumbing, public utilities, class, privacy, common life, London streets, individualism

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.