Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Chaste ValueEconomic Crisis, Female Chastity and the Production of Social Difference on Shakespeare's Stage$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Katherine Gillen

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781474417716

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474417716.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 25 September 2021

Mediterranean Markets, Commoditised Masculinity and the Whitening of Christian Chastity in the Merchant of Venice and the Renegado

Mediterranean Markets, Commoditised Masculinity and the Whitening of Christian Chastity in the Merchant of Venice and the Renegado

Chapter:
(p.205) Chapter 5 Mediterranean Markets, Commoditised Masculinity and the Whitening of Christian Chastity in the Merchant of Venice and the Renegado
Source:
Chaste Value
Author(s):

Katherine Gillen

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474417716.003.0006

This chapter examines the commodity potential of white Europeans in multiracial trading environments. Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice and Massinger’s The Renegado register anxieties about Eastern trade, invoking the specter of captivity to explore the racial, religious, and sexual effects of commoditizing Christian bodies. Both plays resolve crises of personal commoditisation by discursively removing chastity from the commercial realm, a development that mitigates the potentially miscegenational circulation of Christian women and works to reclaim the intrinsic personal value of Christian men. The tragicomic trajectory of each play depends upon transforming chastity from a potential commodity to an inherently Christian—and increasingly white—virtue. As such, the plays’ redefinition of chastity informs their articulation of racial whiteness, which emerges as a repository of intrinsic personal value that exempts certain subjects from the most objectifying aspects of the market, leaving others even more vulnerable to its commoditising energies.

Keywords:   Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice, Massinger’s The Renegado, eastern trade, commerce, commoditisation, chastity, race

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.