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Katherine Mansfield and Psychology$
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Clare Hanson, Gerri Kimber, and W. Todd Martin

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781474417532

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474417532.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 19 September 2021

Me or I? The Search for the Self in the Early Writings of Katherine Mansfield

Me or I? The Search for the Self in the Early Writings of Katherine Mansfield

Chapter:
(p.82) Me or I? The Search for the Self in the Early Writings of Katherine Mansfield
Source:
Katherine Mansfield and Psychology
Author(s):

Louise Edensor

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474417532.003.0007

Katherine Mansfield’s diaries and letters reveal a lifelong concern with notions of the self. In this paper, I examine two of Mansfield’s early stories, ‘Vignette: Summer in Winter’ and ‘The Education of Audrey’, to explore how her enquiry into the construction of the self in fiction demonstrates some affinity with the psychological theories of William James and Sigmund Freud. Mansfield’s approach is intuitive, and this gives rise to contradiction as she experiments with the lexicon of the self and with the form and structure of her stories. Whilst Mansfield posed no ‘theory’ of the self in an academic sense, her fiction does however, illustrate her continuing attempts to puzzle out, and to accurately represent, the complex and mutable nature of the human psyche.

Keywords:   Katherine Mansfield, Psychology, Freud, Henry James, selfconsciousness, unconscious

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