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IslamisationComparative Perspectives from History$
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A. C. S. Peacock

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781474417129

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474417129.001.0001

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Persian Kings, Arab Conquerors and Malay Islam: Comparative Perspectives on the Place of Muslim Epics in the Islamisation of the Chams

Persian Kings, Arab Conquerors and Malay Islam: Comparative Perspectives on the Place of Muslim Epics in the Islamisation of the Chams

Chapter:
(p.472) 23 Persian Kings, Arab Conquerors and Malay Islam: Comparative Perspectives on the Place of Muslim Epics in the Islamisation of the Chams
Source:
Islamisation
Author(s):

Philipp Bruckmayr

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474417129.003.0023

In 1906 the French ethnographer E. M. Durand noted that the most important work of cosmogony among the Cham people of coastal South Vietnam was the so-called Book of Nosirwan.1 Indeed, local tradition holds that the Cham royal line once began with Po Nosirwan, son of the creator of the universe, Po Aulah (Allah). Correctly identifying Nosirwan with the Sasanian king Khusrau (Pers. Anushirvan), Durand was understandably puzzled by the fact that the last great Sasanian king before the Muslim conquest of Persia2 should end up as mythical progenitor of a partly Brahmanist (Cham Jat) and partly Muslim (Cham Bani) Indochinese people. Yet, by noting that the Persian ruler was also an important fi gure in classical Malay literature, the French scholar was defi nitely pointing in the right direction.

Keywords:   Persian, Arab, Muslim, Chams, South Vietnam

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