Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
IslamisationComparative Perspectives from History$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

A. C. S. Peacock

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781474417129

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474417129.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 21 September 2021

Islamisation in the Southern Levant after the End of Frankish Rule: Some General Considerations and a Short Case Study

Islamisation in the Southern Levant after the End of Frankish Rule: Some General Considerations and a Short Case Study

Chapter:
(p.156) 9 Islamisation in the Southern Levant after the End of Frankish Rule: Some General Considerations and a Short Case Study*
Source:
Islamisation
Author(s):

Reuven Amitai

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474417129.003.0009

Two major trends in the development of the lands of the Eastern Mediterranean basin since the Islamic conquests of the mid-seventh century have been Arabisation and Islamisation. This is neither a trivial statement nor a tautology. History is full of examples of invaders who left little or no linguistic or religious impact on the conquered peoples: one need only think of the various Germanic peoples who invaded the Roman Empire, many of whom were eventually Latinised while accepting Christianity. The Bulghars coming into the Balkans in the seventh and eighth centuries soon lost their Turkic language and accepted Christianity in its Greek guise. The Mongols left a great impact on the Middle East in the thirteenth century, but neither their language nor their traditional religion survived in the region (although many words from Mongolian can still be found in Turkish, Persian and occasionally even Arabic). The Franks ruled much of the Levant for almost two centuries, but left the country with little religious and even less linguistic impact. Thus the linguistic and religious success of the Arabs might be considered something of a historical exception.

Keywords:   Islamisation, Franks, Levant, Middle East, Conquest

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.