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The Archaeology of Greece and RomeStudies in Honour of Anthony Snodgrass$
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John Bintliff and N. Keith Rutter

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781474417099

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474417099.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 05 April 2020

Loropéni and Other Large Enclosed Sites in the South-West of Burkina Faso: An Outside Archaeological View

Loropéni and Other Large Enclosed Sites in the South-West of Burkina Faso: An Outside Archaeological View

Chapter:
(p.361) 15 Loropéni and Other Large Enclosed Sites in the South-West of Burkina Faso: An Outside Archaeological View
Source:
The Archaeology of Greece and Rome
Author(s):

Henry Hurst

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474417099.003.0015

The World Heritage site at Loropéni is the best-preserved of about a dozen large quadrangular sites enclosed by stone walls in the southwest of modern Burkina Faso. They are located mostly in the modern Départment of Loropéni a short distance west of the Black Volta river in the Savannah region, roughly midway between the river Niger and the southern edge of the Sahara and the forest belt close to the Atlantic south coast of western Africa (Fig. 15.1). Historically this region is crossed by the major north–south trade routes, linking the trans-Saharan trade of North Africa with the coastal regions. The area close to the sites has been gold-producing, with the mineral extracted from sedimentary deposits mainly by small-scale workings (Kiéthega 1983; Perinbam 1988); and it supports a modest agriculture with millet, sorghum and cotton among its principal products. It is occupied by several ethnic groups, notably the Lobi and the Gan, who, at the start of the colonial period a century ago, and still partly today, could be described as having a village-based social organisation and practising traditional religion (Labouret 1931; Père 1988; 2004).

Keywords:   Loropéni, sites, excavations

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