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The Museum as a Cinematic SpaceThe Display of Moving Images in Exhibitions$
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Elisa Mandelli

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781474416795

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474416795.001.0001

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The Multi-media Museum: The 1960s–70s

The Multi-media Museum: The 1960s–70s

Chapter:
(p.61) Chapter Four The Multi-media Museum: The 1960s–70s
Source:
The Museum as a Cinematic Space
Author(s):

Elisa Mandelli

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474416795.003.0005

This chapter discusses the spreading of film projections and other multi-media and interactive devices in museum galleries in the 1960s–70s, due to the advent of video and technological innovations that rendered these machines more easily available, as well as to the growing importance accorded to the visual design of exhibitions. The chapter also focuses on the curatorial debate about several key issues. It addresses the relationships between museums and their visitors, and the role of multi-media in shaping their interactions. The chapter analyses a seminar held in 1967 by Marshal McLuhan and Harley Parker. In this meeting with museum professionals, the famous communication theorist discussed emerging trends in the communication strategies of museums, which included the role of audio-visual and multi-media devices.

Keywords:   1960s–70s, Video technology, Curatorial Debate, Marshal McLuhan, Harley Parker

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