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May SinclairRe-Thinking Bodies and Minds$
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Rebecca Bowler and Claire Drewery

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781474415750

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474415750.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 28 September 2021

Transgressing Boundaries; Transcending Bodies: Sublimation and the Abject Corpus in Uncanny Stories and Tales Told by Simpson

Transgressing Boundaries; Transcending Bodies: Sublimation and the Abject Corpus in Uncanny Stories and Tales Told by Simpson

Chapter:
(p.213) Chapter 11 Transgressing Boundaries; Transcending Bodies: Sublimation and the Abject Corpus in Uncanny Stories and Tales Told by Simpson
Source:
May Sinclair
Author(s):

Claire Drewery

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474415750.003.0012

This chapter traces an early-twentieth century cultural change in perceptions of the nature and representation of reality, the breakdown of the dominant Victorian discourses of humanism and realism and the concurrent Modernist reconstitution of the human subject. I examine this epochal shift through a consideration of May Sinclair’s engagement with contemporary philosophical and psychoanalytical discourses, her personal crisis of Anglican faith and her growing interest in philosophical Idealism. The theme of guilt, this chapter will claim, is closely associated in Sinclair’s writing with the Modernist re-examination of both physical and textual bodies in the light of burgeoning contemporary discourses – both philosophical and scientific – surrounding subjective identity. Guilt is constantly evoked through an emphasis on spirituality and mystical themes and their frequent juxtaposition with psychoanalytic theories of sublimation.

Keywords:   Guilt, sublimation, philosophy, short stories, subjectivity, mysticism

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