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The Lyric Poem and AestheticismForms of Modernity$
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Marion Thain

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781474415668

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474415668.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 28 July 2021

Ezra Pound’s Troubadour Subject: Community, Form and ‘Lyric’ in Early Modernism

Ezra Pound’s Troubadour Subject: Community, Form and ‘Lyric’ in Early Modernism

Chapter:
(p.210) Chapter 10 Ezra Pound’s Troubadour Subject: Community, Form and ‘Lyric’ in Early Modernism
Source:
The Lyric Poem and Aestheticism
Author(s):

Marion Thain

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474415668.003.0011

This final case study also acts as a historical ‘coda’ to the trajectory of aestheticist lyric traced within this book. It connects it with the twentieth century and with the better known story of lyric within high modernism. Starting with Pound’s intense historical engagement with lyric in the earliest part of his career, and with his troubadour poem ‘Cino’, the chapter opens with an analysis of the significance of community through refrain. It then moves on to trace the substantial influence of aestheticist poets on this early work, and offers an original account of the significance of Ernest Dowson and the Rhymers’ Club for Pound’s work. The chapter ends with an account of modernism’s troubled relationship with the conceptualisation of lyric inherited from the nineteenth century.

Keywords:   Ezra Pound, Ernest Dowson, Rhymers’ Club, Modernism, Troubadour, Refrain, Collectivity

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