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Sentencing OrlandoVirginia Woolf and the Morphology of the Modernist Sentence$
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Elsa Högberg and Amy Bromley

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781474414609

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474414609.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 31 May 2020

‘Let us go, then, exploring’: Intertextual Conversations on the Meaning of Life

‘Let us go, then, exploring’: Intertextual Conversations on the Meaning of Life

Chapter:
(p.68) Chapter 5 ‘Let us go, then, exploring’: Intertextual Conversations on the Meaning of Life
Source:
Sentencing Orlando
Author(s):

Sanja Bahun

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474414609.003.0006

In this chapter, Sanja Bahun pursues intertextual echoes in Woolf’s poetic engagement with T. S. Eliot. Bahun’s chosen sentence rewrites the opening of ‘The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock’ (1915) and is embedded in a densely allusive passage that also cites Joyce, Forster and Lawrence. With careful attention to rhythm and syntax, Bahun shows how Woolf’s rewriting of Eliot invokes and transforms the emerging, predominantly male modernist canon in a vibrant exploration of modern subjecthood and the question: ‘How does one represent life?’

Keywords:   canonicity, intertextuality, life, literary history, modernism, poetics, subjectivity, T. S. Eliot

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