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Semiramis' LegacyThe History of Persia According to Diodorus of Sicily$
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Jan Stronk

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781474414258

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474414258.001.0001

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The Vicissitudes of the Diadoch Kingdoms: The Final Years of Diodorus’ Persian Account

The Vicissitudes of the Diadoch Kingdoms: The Final Years of Diodorus’ Persian Account

Chapter:
(p.473) 9 The Vicissitudes of the Diadoch Kingdoms: The Final Years of Diodorus’ Persian Account
Source:
Semiramis' Legacy
Author(s):

Jan P. Stronk

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474414258.003.0010

This chapter falls, in fact, apart in two parts, the first discussing the events, from 310 bc onward, leading up to the Battle of Ipsus (which took place in 301 bc and where Antigonus the One-eyed was killed and Demetrius barely survived) and the battle’s aftermath, the second part discussing the period between c. 280 and c. 64 bc, when the arrival of Pompey formally ended the Seleucid empire, already weakened due to the invasion of the Parthians. In this second part, several Seleucid rulers feature prominently. The end of the Seleucid empire marked the end of Diodorus’ history of Persia. The Ptolemies survived about 30 years longer as rulers before they also formally submitted to Rome: their demise ended the Hellenist kingdoms.

Keywords:   Antigonus the One-eyed, Demetrius, Seleucus, Ptolemy I Soter, Ptolemies, Seleucids, Romans, Parthians, Pompey

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